Buy Cage Free Eggs, cut salmonella risk in half

August 23, 2010

The latest, and ever growing, egg recall illustrates the risk to public health of cramming millions of hens in cages so small they can barely move an inch their whole lives, says animal rights protection organisation HSUS in the USA.

“Factory farms that cram egg-laying hens into tiny cages are not only cruel, but they threaten food safety,” stated Michael Greger, MD director of public health and animal agriculture for The Humane Society of the United States. “According to the best available science, simply by switching to cage-free housing systems, the egg industry may be able to halve the risk of Salmonella for the American public.”

According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 100,000 Americans suffer egg-borne Salmonella infections every year, HSUS states. An increase in Salmonella infections led this week to a nationwide recall of eggs from Wright County Egg in Galt, Iowa. Every single scientific study published in recent years comparing Salmonella contamination between cage and cage-free operations has found that confining hens in cages significantly increases Salmonella risk.

To protect public health, the industry must take steps to reduce risks on the farm, including moving to cage-free operations, HSUS says.

You can help, one egg purchase at a time. Buy local, buy cage free.

One Response to “Buy Cage Free Eggs, cut salmonella risk in half”

  1. Maree Wragg Says:

    I o buy cage free, or preferably, free range eggs. BUT, i have noticed that they often have gone off before the use by date is up. If hens are laying their eggs where they wish, there is no guarantee that they have been packed the day they were laid, in fact they may have been sitting under a bush, and not found for several days, but they are date stamped the same date as the rest of the eggs picked up on that day.
    I would not go back to buying caged eggs, but,sometimes when i smell and “off” egg, i wonder if i am about to get samonella poisoning


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