Romaine lettuce recall

July 23, 2009

lettuce

Tanimura & Antle Inc. of Salinas has issued a recall for 22,000 cartons of bulk or wrapped romaine marked with the lot code 531380. The lettuce was harvested between June 25 and July 2, and sold to retail, wholesale and food service outlets across the United States, Canada and Puerto Rico. The company is recalling the lettuce because it may be contaminated with salmonella.

Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections, especially in young children, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems.

For more information go to: http://tiny.cc/W5DmP

recall2

The Food Safety & Inspection Service (FSIS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture has announced a “Class I, High Health Risk” recall due to contamination of beef by E. coli O157:H7.

A HIGH RISK, Class 1 recall is a “a health hazard situation where there is a reasonable probability that the use of the product will cause serious, adverse health consequences or death.” Read the rest of this entry »

ecoli bacYes, that really is what E.Coli looks like.

Image: Eric Erbe/Christopher Pooley/USDA

International Meat Co., Inc., a Chicago, Ill., establishment is recalling approximately 6,152 pounds of ground beef products that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7.

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness.

For more information go to: http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_033_2009_Release/index.asp

Holten Meat, Inc., a Sauget, Ill., establishment, is recalling approximately 241,000 pounds of ground beef product that may contain foreign materials (metal chips).

The following product is subject to recall:
20-pound cases of “100% PURE GROUND BEEF BULK.” Each case contains four (4) 5-pound Keeper Casing Chubs per box, which can be identified by the package code “12000” and the label code “1007982112000.” Each product is also labeled “PACKED FOR INSTITUTIONAL USE ONLY” — “NOT FOR RESALE.”

Each label bears the establishment number “EST-02591” inside the USDA mark of inspection. The product was produced on various dates from January 2009 through May 2009 and was distributed to institutions in Del., Fla., Ill., Ky., N.C., N.M., Ohio, S.C., Tenn., Texas, and Va.

The problem was discovered after the company received complaints from institutional customers about finding metal clips, which were used to seal the casing chubs, in the product. .

Consumer questions regarding the recall should be directed to the Company spokesperson, Pat Flanigan at: (618) 337-8400, ext. 261.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/News_&_Events/Recall_025_2009_Release/index.asp

The USDA has recalled 96,000 pounds of ground beef with a “Class I” issue, meaning  that the risk of the E.Coli bacteria in the meat is very high.  The tainted beef comes from an Illinois manufacturer. A full list of contaminated beef products can be found on the Food Safety and Inspection Service website www.fsis.usda.gov

E. coli O157:H7 is a potentially deadly bacterium that can cause bloody diarrhea, dehydration, and in the most severe cases, kidney failure. The very young, seniors and persons with weak immune systems are the most susceptible to foodborne illness.

Before grilling out, check and make sure that your ground beef is not on the recall list.  Always cook ground beef until well done.  Stay healthy and safe!

Rutgers Food Policy Institute (FPI) released a study today showing that many Americans fail to check their homes for recalled food products. Only about 60 percent of the studied sample reported having looked for recalled food in their homes, and only 10 percent said they had ever found a recalled food product. The study was based on a survey of 1,101 Americans interviewed by telephone from Aug. 4 to Sept. 24, 2008.

Most respondents also said they pay a great deal of attention to food recalls and, when they learn about them, they tell many other people. But 40 percent of these consumers think the foods they purchase are less likely to be recalled than those purchased by others, appearing to believe that food recalls just don‟t apply to them.

“Despite widespread awareness of recent foodborne illness outbreaks, and a sense that the number of food recalls is increasing, about half of Americans say that food recalls have had no impact on their lives,” said psychologist William K. Hallman, a professor of human ecology at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences.

“Getting consumers to pay attention to news about recalls isn‟t the hard part but getting them to take the step of actually looking for recalled food products in their homes is a real challenge.” Hallman is also the director of FPI and lead author of the study report. Read the rest of this entry »

Between 2003 and 2007, the FDA’s main food-safety arm lost 20 percent of its science staff and 600 inspectors. The United States gets 15 percent of its food from foreign countries, including 60 percent of its fresh fruits and vegetables and 75 percent of its seafood, but just 1 percent of all imported food is inspected.

Source: http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/editorial_opinion/editorials/articles/2009/04/11/food_safety_for_this_century/